NANOPOL

NANOPOL

Number of consortium partners:6
Coordinating entity:CERTH/CPERI
Full title:Development of Novel Electrochemical Processes for Water Treatment Applications Using Composite Electrodes based on Nanocarbon Materials and Conductive Polymers
Abstract:Currently, desalination has been one of the major issues globally. Capacitive deionization (CDI), also known as electrosorption, has been recently receiving great interests in desalination field due to its lower energy consumption and environmental friendliness, compared to conventional desalination technologies such as reverse osmosis, distillation and electrodialysis.
Despite of all the advantages of CDI, the relatively low efficiency has always been a limitation for its industrialization, which is mainly caused by the co-ions expulsion effect. When an electric potential is applied between electrodes, counter-ion adsorption and co-ion expulsion effects happen simultaneously, which leads to a higher energy consumption and a lower desalination efficiency.
To solve this problem ion-exchange membranes can be introduced in the CDI system, a technology called Membrane Capacitive Deionization (mCDI). The salt removal of mCDI system can be improved largely and can reach even 50% higher than that of CDI system. The development and synthesis of better electrode materials (high specific surface area, suitable pore size distribution, stability, low electrical resistivity, hydrophilicity, etc) is the most critical issue for the success of electrochemical separation processes, including mCDI.
The main goal of this research project is the development of innovative nanocomposite electrodes and ion-exchange membranes with a combination of carbon nanostructures (carbon nanotubes, graphene etc.) and conductive polymers and their use in innovative electrochemical processes for deionization and water treatment.
The main objectives of the NANOPOL project are a) to develop or/and adopt suitable and efficient materials (electrodes, ion-exchange membranes in MCDI) and b) to arrange appropriately the various components within the basic cell unit (molecular and geometrical details of the electrode structure and of the ion-exchange membranes). The final goal is to rescale the process on a larger scale and real operating conditions. For this reason, simulation studies for the process optimization and the design of the materials  will be carried out. Furthermore, the developed methodology will be demonstrated  for further exploitation and industrial use
Website:COMING SOON
  • On 30 July 2019